Mogurnda cingulata

Most people like to keep other animals in their aquarium, as companions for their rainbowfish. Here you'll learn all about them.

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AussiePeter
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Re: Mogurnda cingulata

Post#16 » Sat Apr 02, 2016 4:39 am

Freshwater gudgeons (Eleotridae) and gobies (Gobiidae) along with rainbowfishes (Melanotaeniidae) dominate freshwater habitats of Australia and New Guinea. These three familes (out of around 35-40 present in the region) account for over half of all the species. Each group has in excess of 100 species each. There are very few places where fish from one of these three families are not present!

Great pics too, thanks for sharing Andreas!

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Peter

Dirk G.
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Re: Mogurnda cingulata

Post#17 » Mon Apr 18, 2016 10:05 am

Hi,

Thank you both for your info but I am not fully satisfied.

From the biotope picture I see a water body with monotone gravel - my question is what are the niches for all these very similar fishes (same size, hunting the same pray)?

With rainbow fishes for example, we see may be 2 species (of different genera) one more living in the middle of a creek with current, one more in deeper pools etc. Here we have half a dozen of gobies/gudgeons in a place that looks like a habitat without niches to me...
Dirk

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Adrian
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Re: Mogurnda cingulata

Post#18 » Wed Apr 20, 2016 12:27 am

Dirk G. wrote:Hi,

Thank you both for your info but I am not fully satisfied.

From the biotope picture I see a water body with monotone gravel - my question is what are the niches for all these very similar fishes (same size, hunting the same pray)?

With rainbow fishes for example, we see may be 2 species (of different genera) one more living in the middle of a creek with current, one more in deeper pools etc. Here we have half a dozen of gobies/gudgeons in a place that looks like a habitat without niches to me...



What I see when I look at the images is dry season habitats where the lack of rain has concentrated all surviving fishes in pools or "waterholes" along the length of the river. This type of situation is common in both Australia and New Guinea due to the influence of a wet and dry season. During the dry season water levels are reduced and in rivers and creeks which eventually dry up, most of the water is confined in relatively small areas (i.e., broken channels, billabongs and swamps) Some of the fishes will survive the dry and when the wet season comes will spread out along the river and tributaries, feed, spawn and enjoy life until the next dry season comes again.

Adrian

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Re: Mogurnda cingulata

Post#19 » Sat Apr 23, 2016 2:38 pm

Moin Dirk,

there was many micro habitats in the dry season, pools with acidic and soft water in rain forrest with small Oxyeleotris nullipora. Pools at the river with Mogurnda, but Mogurnda are generalists, we found it at many location. Soft flowing places at the river with border vegetation, here we found bigger Oxyeleotris fimbriata and Bostrychus strigogenys, they was looking for shrimps and small fishes. Many craterocephalus was there and peck algae. At the faster flowing locations, we found Glossogobius concavifrons, mainly on gravel, Glossogobius require oxygen-richer water. I think they hunt water insects, mini shrimps, the Glossogobius aureus (bigger mouth) too and also little fishes.

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Re: Mogurnda cingulata

Post#20 » Sat Apr 23, 2016 2:48 pm

Another places

A little creek near the big river, with Mogurnda cingulata and Melanotaenia rubrostriata
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Faster flowing area at the Sungai Mimika, with P.pellucidus, Craterocephalus nouhouysi, Melanotaenia goldiei and Glossogobius concavifrons
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Pools in a rain forrest with Oxyeleotris nullipora
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